More about this city…

The bad news:

Millions of dollars of corruption and incompetence, and ghost streets. Enlarge the picture in that link; a stitched-together image of a street not far from my house, from a blog I follow.

The good news:

Someone wants to put the abandoned lots to good use.

I want a garden. I am looking forward to hypothetical houses & gardens & fireplaces & porches & good friends.

Right now I am on break and shlepping around as per usual. Give me a call.

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4 Responses to More about this city…

  1. Wendy Kennedy says:

    The urban farm thing sounds nice to those who know nothing of farming, but for those who know the challenges face by American farmers, this is unworkable. How can people who can’t afford to pay a mortgage payment pay the costs of equipment, seed, feed needed for “a big farm” (40 acres, by the way, is hardly a big farm! No one could live off of 40 acres!) What of the health issues of chemical pesticides & fertilizers being used in dense population centers? Ever read about the residential complaints of farm smells, driving farmers further & further from population? Ever look at the costs of raising livestock or supporting horses? What one tractor & plow costs?

    I guess what I wonder is- why do we have so many homeless on Detroit streets (heard at the Capuchin soup kitchen that Detroit has one of the highest rates of homelessness in the nation!), losing limbs to frostbite in the winter, when there are so many empty homes? Perhaps an abandoned home could be part of the unemployment package?

  2. Saracita says:

    The farm is being proposed by Hantz… the benefits for the people of Detroit would be jobs created, another opportunity for fresh and local vegetables, and a productive use of at least some of the space that is currently filled with abandoned houses and crime. Let big companies who can afford to invest in something like this buy the tractors and whatnot.

    As for abandoned homes, it’s not that simple. They are still owned by someone. The homeless can’t afford to buy them, and no one else wants to. There are plenty of people living in these abandoned houses, but that’s not that helpful.

  3. annadefenestrated says:

    My ex-friend Adrienne said she once taught kids who didn’t know what vegetables looked like in their natural form. They knew how much all the combo meals at McD’s were, though, to the penny.

    I think micro-farming would be a good thing.

    I don’t know much about farming, just that if you grow corn you need a lot of space to plant a bunch so it can fertilize itself as the wind blows.

    Maybe the city could buy the houses or do a ‘taking.’ Sim City 2000 was a great game- you could just bulldoze abandoned buildings and create the city however you wanted. Too bad RL isn’t like that…

    But like you said in a previous post, people have real love for this city despite it’s Rou

  4. annadefenestrated says:

    My ex-friend Adrienne said she once taught kids who didn’t know what vegetables looked like in their natural form. They knew how much all the combo meals at McD’s were, though, to the penny.

    I think micro-farming would be a good thing.

    I don’t know much about farming, just that if you grow corn you need a lot of space to plant a bunch so it can fertilize itself as the wind blows.

    Maybe the city could buy the houses or do a ‘taking.’ Sim City 2000 was a great game- you could just bulldoze abandoned buildings and create the city however you wanted. Too bad RL isn’t like that…

    But like you said in a previous post, people have real love for this city despite it’s Rough edges. When I went back, I felt horrified and also missed it’s dirty, ramshackle, depressing face. It still seems to me to be full of punk rock spirit. I don’t know why I think that. Maybe because every time I went there, I always went to places with rockabilly chicks, punks with their boots and pierced nipples.

    There’s style in Detroit. Pride is still there. The architecture is still beautiful, broken down as it is. I don’t have to deal with the realities of the poverty and crime, so from this distance it looks romantic, even though I know it’s not. (I worked at a soup kitchen once a while back and saw a few things I wish I wouldn’t have.)

    My dad grew up there and went to college there for a few years before transferring to Michigan Tech in the UP.

    But ANYWAY, we all root for Detroit to come back. I hope it does.

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